14 GIUGNO 2017

What do you think of the bands that fit political thoughts in their lyrics? Do you think that political idea but also the religious one can influence the natural evolution of a band that looks out into the underground world and then into the mainstream?

 

Giacomo Burgassi:

Well, I think that political and religious thoughts are really important today. Everywhere, in the world, there’s a struggle and you create your own idea when you read the news or watch the TV. The lyrics are your vehicle to say or scream something to the people and this process set you free! For me, it’s very natural talking about society or God and I think it’s the same for the other bands without looking into the mainstream.

 

Do you think there is an "Italian metal scene"? What do you think about that?

 

Giacomo Burgassi:

The Italian metal scene especially the underground scene is alive but it needs restoration. There are some really great bands but it’s increasingly difficult to find stages and places for live concerts. We all have to find a way to attract more people that really want to hear live performances and revitalize the “metal scene”.

 

How much important is the production? Do you think it’s a factor to consider as the music is considered itself, since it’s increasingly rare to find bands with clear ideas?

 

Giacomo Burgassi:

For me, the production is a very important thing to consider. I spend a lot of time working on my sound and on the band’s sound for studio records and for live concerts. Only with an appropriate production you can hear the real soul of the band. It seems to me that too many bands focus on technical virtuosities and complicated structures, so they always have “artificial” sounds without dynamic.

 

What kinds of effects do you use when you play? Are them the same you use to

register?

 

Giacomo Burgassi:

Yeah, the only difference is the cabinet! When I play live I use a 1960AX with 4 Celestion Greenbacks, but on the album I use a 1960AV with 2 Celestion Greenbacks and 2 Celestion Vintage30. The head is a Marshall JCM800 2203ZW with only a BOSS SD-1 as overdrive.

 

How do you promote your music on the web? Do you have ideas to suggest to other bands?

 

Giacomo Burgassi:

Facebook and YouTube help us to promote our music, today they are the best and most famous sites! But I think that you have to record a demo or an album in high quality and play as best as you can live if you want to come to light.

 

Which bands have inspired you to put on a group? In which kind of sounds you were involved when you’ve decided to have your band?

 

Giacomo Burgassi:

My main inspirations are obviously thrash metal bands of the 80s: I’m a huge fan of Metallica!! Hetfield’s guitar sound and vocal style have a special place in my heart. Also, I really love the voice of Tom Araya and Slayer: that’s why I’ve always want a thrash metal band. You can clearly hear influences in “Feral Evolution” of Exodus and Anthrax too.

 

In your opinion, how much the music is changed in the Internet age?

Don’t you think that we have lost the listener's approach to the music itself?

 

Giacomo Burgassi:

Absolutely!! Today people listen to the music on YouTube or Spotify too quickly and too approximately, only the quality of video or the look of the band really matters. The consequence is that songs become more short and catchy: all is dictated by the trend of the moment.

 

The artwork of an album is very important, perhaps the first approach for a future fan. What do you want to infuse with the yours?

 

Edoardo Natalini:

Our artworks are conceptual representation of stories or inner journeys, often inspired by the lyrics themselves. More than that we also want to create a big impact on the person who happen to find the album among hundreds of others, evoking weird and imaginative landscapes, in a very late 70s-early 80s vynil fashion.

 

Do you have a particular project as a goal? What’s your ultimate one? How do you see yourself from here in a few years?

 

Edoardo Natalini:

We just want to see people in front of the stage, having fun, drinking and moshing. They could be two, three, one hundred, one thousand. Doesn't matter.

 

What should convince the audience to listen to your own material in such a vast music competition?

 

Edoardo Natalini:

Dystopic loud heavy thrash stuff with psycothic angry lyrics. How could you not love it?

 

Do you have similar or different music background?

 

Edoardo Natalini:

Basically we share the same deep love for the bay area sound and the classic heavy metal style. We had previous experiences with doom, prog rock or more old school 70s sound, and that's good. Even the smallest thing can add something cool and different in your approach.

 

Who do you like to go on tour with?

 

Edoardo Natalini:

Whoever can compete with us in a drinking contest.